Origine paienne du Ramadan

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Origine paienne du Ramadan

Nouveau messagede Morpheus » 13 Déc 2010 22

Origine polytheistes du ramadan

archeologie-histoire/origine-paienne-ramadan-t866.html


Ramadan has Pagan Roots in India and the Middle East

Ramadan, the ninth month of the Islamic calendar and the rigid observance of thirty days of fasting during the daylight hours, has pagan roots developed in India and the Middle East. The observance of fasting to honor the moon, and ending the fast when the moon’s crescent appears, was practiced with the rituals of the Eastern worshippers of the moon. Both Ibn al-Nadim and the Shahrastani tell us about al-Jandrikinieh, an Indian sect which began to fast when the moon disappeared and ended the fast with a great feast when the crescent reappeared[1].

The Sabians, who were pagans in the Middle East, were identified with two groups, the Mandaeans and the Harranians. The Mandaeans lived in Iraq during the 2nd century A.D. As they continue to do today, they worshipped multiple gods, or “light personalities.” Their gods were classified under four categories: “first life,” “second life,” “third life” and “fourth life.” Old gods belong to the “first life” category. They summoned deities who, in turn, created “second life” deities, and so forth.

The other group, considered as Sabians, were the Harranians. They worshipped Sin, the moon, as their main deity, but they also worshipped planets and other deities. The Sabians were in contact with Ahnaf, an Arabian group which Mohammed joined before claiming to be a prophet. Ahnaf sought knowledge by going to Northern Iraq, where there were many communities of Mandaeans. They also went to the city of Harran in the al-Jazirah district in northern Syria on the border between Syria, Iraq and Asia Minor.

In Mecca, the Ahnaf were called Sabians because of the doctrines they embraced. Later, when Mohammed claimed to be a prophet, he was called a Sabian by the inhabitants of Mecca because they saw him performing many Sabian rites which included praying five times a day; performing several movements in prayer that were identical with the Mandaeans and the Harranians; and making ablution, or ceremonial washing, before each prayer. In the Qur'an, Mohammed called the Sabians “people of the book” like the Jews and Christians.

Ramadan was a pagan ceremony practiced by the Sabians, whether they were Harranians or Sabians. From the writings of Abu Zanad, an Arabic writer from Iraq who lived around 747 A.D., we conclude that at least one Mandaean community located in northern Iraq observed Ramadan[ii][2].

Ramadan was Originally an Annual Ritual Performed at the City of Harran. Similarities Between the Ramadan of Harran and the Islamic Ramadan.

Although the fasting of Ramadan was practiced in pre-Islamic times by the pagans of Jahiliyah, it was introduced to Arabia by the Harranians. Harran was a city on the border between Syria and Iraq, very close to Asia Minor which, today, is Turkey. Their main deity was the moon, and in the worship of the moon, they conducted a major fast which lasted thirty days. It began the eighth of March and usually finished the eighth of April. Arabic historians, such as Ibn Hazm, identify this fast with Ramadan.[iii][3]

Ibn al-Nadim wrote in his book, al-Fahrisit, about various religious sects in the Middle East. He says in the month in which the Harranians fasted for thirty days, they honored the god Sin, which is the moon. Al-Nadim described the feasts they celebrated and the sacrifices they presented to the moon.[iv][4] Another historian, Ibn Abi Zinad also speaks about the Harranians, saying that they fast for thirty days, they look toward Yemen when they fast, and they pray five times a day.[v][5] We know that Muslims also pray five times a day. Harranian fasting is also similar to that of Ramadan in Islam in the fact that they fast from before the sun rises until the sunset, just as the Muslims do during the days of Ramadan.[vi][6] Still another historian, Ibn al-Juzi, described the Harranian fasting during this month. He said they concluded their fasting by sacrificing animals and presenting alms to the poor.[vii][7] We also find these things in Islamic fasting today.

Mythological roots concerning Harran’s celebration of the moon explained the disappearance of the moon after it joined with the star cluster, Pleiades, in the constellation of Taurus. It occurred during the third week of March. The people prayed to the moon, pleading for its return to the city of Harran, but the moon refused to return. This is thought to be the explanation for why they fasted during this month. The moon did not promise to return to Harran, but it did promise to return to Deyr Kadi, a sanctuary near one of the gates of Harran. So after this month, the worshippers of Sin, the moon, went to Deyr Kadi to celebrate and to welcome the return of the moon.[viii][8] According to Ibn al-Nadim, the historian mentioned earlier, the Harranians called the feast al-Feter عيد الفطر , the same name by which the feast of Ramadan is named[ix][9].

In addition to the feast during Ramadan, the Harranians had five prayers which they repeated day and night. Each had to be preceded by ablutions, which were ceremonial washings.[x][10] The same system of five prayers each day, preceded by ablutions, was embraced by Mohammed.

The fasting of Ramadan spread from Harran into Arabia. This may have occurred after the occupation of Nabonidus, the Babylonian king, to the north of Arabia, around the year 552 B.C., during his sojourn in the city of Teima. Nabonidus was from the city of Harran. He was a fanatic worshipper of the moon, Sin, and his mother was a priest of Sin. He disagreed with the priests of Babylonia who considered the god, Marduk, as the chief of the gods of Babylonia. Nabonidus was eager to spread the worship of Sin, the moon, as the main deity. So he left his son in charge of Babylonia and went to live in Teima in North Arabia.

Suite et source http://religionresearchinstitute.org/ramadan/roots.htm


Excellent livre [i]L'Islam dans le livre apocalypse (Version francaise)


Livre Disponible ici http://www.islam-bible-prophecy.com/apocalypse/


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Re: Origine paienne du Ramadan

Nouveau messagede Morpheus » 5 Jan 2011 16

voici d'autres informations qui confirment les origines paiennes de l'islam et d'une divinite lunaire

Éclipse du 4 janvier: Comment gagner des hassanates (les points-bonis pour entrer au paradis)

« En vérité, dans la création des cieux et de la terre, et dans l’alternance de la nuit et du jour, il y a certes des signes pour les doués d’intelligence »
[coran, sourate 3 : verset 190]

Manière d’accomplir la prière de l’éclipse

Les gens se rassemblent à la mosquée sans appel ni annonce . L’imam fait deux cycles de prière avec dans chaque cycle deux inclinaisons et deux prosternations. La récitation du Coran y est très prolongée ainsi que l’inclinaison et la prosternation. Si l’éclipse prend fin pendant la prière, on termine la prière comme une prière normale.

Éclipse solaire et éclipse lunaire

Il existe la prière de l’éclipse solaire, et celle de l’éclipse lunaire; toutes deux sont identiques.

Faire cette prière en groupe

Les imams Mâlik, Ach-Châfi’i et Ahmad ainsi que beaucoup d’érudits ont jugé que faire la prière de l’éclipse en groupe est une tradition prophétique, Abou Yoûssouf et Mahomet ont dit que c’était une des conditions de la prière.


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Re: Origine paienne du Ramadan

Nouveau messagede Morpheus » 6 Jan 2011 19

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